The Writers’ Trust of Canada is a charitable organization on a mission to advance, nurture, and celebrate Canadian writers and writing.

Prize Guidelines



A prize of $10,000 will be awarded for the best collection of unpublished poetry. Three finalists will each receive $2,500 and a mentorship opportunity, and will be featured in a digital award ceremony.  


Looking for the 2021 RBC Bronwen Wallace Award short fiction guidelines and submission form?



To be eligible, a writer must be:


  • A Canadian citizen or permanent resident


  • Published in an independently edited literary magazine or anthology


  • Unpublished in book form and without a book contract (a self-published book or chapbook is not disqualifying)



To submit an entry:


  • Eligible candidates should send 5-10 pages of previously unpublished poetry. 


  • Candidates grant the Writers’ Trust of Canada permission to publish their work in print and digital formats should they be shortlisted (all rights reserved by the author).



Formatting guidelines:


  • Give your submission one overall title. Include the title at the top of your manuscript and in the file name of your PDF, and ensure both match the name given for your submission. You do not need a title page. 


  • Your manuscript must not include your name or any identifying information. 


  • Include consecutively numbered page numbers. 


  • Do not use large images within your manuscript.


  • Use any font you wish in 11 pt size.





SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 22, 2021 (11:59pm PT)

Three finalists will be announced in May. The winner will be announced in June via a digital award ceremony.



For more information, please visit writerstrust.com or contact:

Devon Jackson, Program Manager
djackson@writerstrust.com

Prize Guidelines



A prize of $10,000 will be awarded for the best collection of unpublished short fiction. Three finalists will each receive $2,500 and a mentorship opportunity, and will be featured in a digital award ceremony.  


Looking for the 2021 RBC Bronwen Wallace Award poetry guidelines and submission form?



To be eligible, a writer must be:


  • A Canadian citizen or permanent resident


  • Published in an independently edited literary magazine or anthology


  • Unpublished in book form and without a book contract (a self-published book or chapbook is not disqualifying)



To submit an entry:


  • Eligible candidates should send 5-10 pages (up to 2,500 words) of previously unpublished short fiction. 


  • Candidates grant the Writers’ Trust of Canada permission to publish their work in print and digital formats should they be shortlisted (all rights reserved by the author).



Formatting guidelines:


  • Give your submission one overall title. Include that title at the top of your manuscript and in the file name of your PDF, and ensure both match the name given for your submission. You do not need a title page within your submission. 


  • Your manuscript must not include your name or any identifying information. 


  • Include consecutively numbered page numbers. 


  • Do not use large images within your manuscript.


  • Use any font you wish in 11 pt size.


  • Double or 1.5 line spacing is preferred.






SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 22, 2021 (11:59pm PT)  




Three finalists will be announced in May. The winner will be announced in June via a digital award ceremony.



For more information, please visit writerstrust.com or contact:

Devon Jackson, Program Manager
djackson@writerstrust.com

The Writers’ Trust Mentorship provides support, guidance, and one-on-one instruction to a developing writer from an established writer. The program is sponsored by RBC’s Emerging Artists Project,

Three mentors are selected by the Writers’ Trust, each working in one of the fields of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Each mentor selects one mentee from a pool of applicants to work with over a 5-month period. Beyond instruction, mentees will also receive $2,500. The mentorship period runs May-September 2021.


How the Mentorships will Operate

Mentorship pairs will connect regularly, either by email, phone, video conference, or, if possible, face-to-face. Their correspondence will revolve around the submission and review of a mutually agreed upon number of manuscript pages. The frequency of exchange will be tailored to the schedules and work habits of the individuals involved. It is expected that mentees will commit between 30-40 hours per month and potentially beyond. Mentors are expected to commit 15-20 hours per month.  


Eligibility

To be eligible candidates must:

  • be Canadian citizens or permanent residents
  • have previously published creative work in an independently edited journal, magazine, anthology, or chapbook
  • not have previously published a full-length manuscript
  • be completing a substantial work-in-progress in either fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction and be at the stage where a set of outside, expert eyes is valuable in preparing the manuscript for submission to a publisher. Applicants must be in a position to receive and respond to feedback during their mentorship and not still be in the throes of drafting their manuscript. To that end, it is suggested that applicants be at the following approximate stages of development:
                        - Fiction: 150 pages, double spaced
                         - Poetry: 75 pages, double spaced
                         - Literary nonfiction:
                                 - 150 pages, double spaced (if writing a personal narrative or book of essays) OR
                                 - Near completion of a fully-realized book proposal which includes an outline, research plan, and a couple of chapters (if writing a journalistic work)
  • Prepare their submission in English
  • Note that this program is intended for writers who do not have other resources at hand for professional mentorship. As such, students currently enrolled in degree or diploma granting writing programs and those engaged in a working relationship with a professional editor/publisher are not eligible for this program.






Application Materials Required

  • A 10-page, double spaced sample from their work-in-progress
  • A synopsis of their work-in-progress (no more than 500 words)
  • A work plan that explains where they are with their current project, what they hope to gain from this mentorship, and how it will benefit their artistic development (no more than 1000 words)
  • A short biography in paragraph form (no more than 125 words)
  • Their entire work-in-progress in its draft form



How Are Mentees Selected?

Applications will be assessed on the basis of: 

  • literary excellence and/or potential
  • viability of project plan
  • expression of willingness to be responsive and receptive to learning from the experience
  • sense that the applicant is poised to make the most of a mentorship at this particular moment in the development of their project




SUBMISSION DEADLINE:

Monday, March 8, 2021 (11:59pm PT)

The selected mentees will be contacted in April 2021.


PARTICIPATING MENTORS

Pasha Malla

Pasha Malla is an author of poetry and fiction, including the short story collection The Withdrawal Method and the novels People Park, Fugue States, and Kill the Mall. His writing has won the Danuta Gleed Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award, an Arthur Ellis Award, and several National Magazine awards. He has also been shortlisted for the Amazon.ca Best First Novel Award and the Commonwealth Prize, and longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Malla has taught creative writing at York University, the University of Toronto, and Brock University. He lives in Hamilton, Ontario. 


“I’m excited to work with a writer who reads voraciously and deeply; who can situate their work within specific political, cultural, and literary contexts; who is formally ambitious, intellectually curious and emotionally generous; who believes that language is more than just a vehicle to ferry plot to readers; and who is committed and driven and willing to push themself, and me, to make their writing as honest, original, and compelling as possible.”




Joshua Whitehead

Joshua Whitehead is the author of the poetry collection full-metal indigiqueer, which was shortlisted for an inaugural Indigenous Voices Award and the Stephan G. Stephansson Award for Poetry. His novel Jonny Appleseed was longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, won the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Fiction, and is a 2021 contender for CBC Canada Reads. His work has been published in Prairie Fire, CV2, EVENT, Arc Poetry Magazine, The Fiddlehead, Grain, CNQ, and Red Rising Magazine. Whitehead is a Two-Spirit, Oji-nêhiyaw member of Peguis First Nation on Treaty 1 in Manitoba. He is currently working toward a PhD in Indigenous literatures and cultures at the University of Calgary on Treaty 7 territory in Alberta.

“I’m looking for a writer who celebrates writing from and for their bodies – in all of its connotations (bodies of water and land, physical bodies, immaterial bodies, bodies of text). I’m looking for a poet who can focus on the mundane and make from it a universe: a freckle holding historical legacies. I would love to work with a mentee who has a structure for their manuscript envisioned and one who is enriched in thinking about how words crack open and reveal entangled meanings. BIPOC and/or queer writers are strongly encouraged to apply!”




Jenny Heijun Wills

Jenny Heijun Wills is the author of the memoir Older Sister. Not Necessarily Related., which won the 2019 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction and the Eileen McTavish Sykes best first book award, and was named a best book of the year by The Globe and Mail and CBC. She writes about race and ethnicity both as a scholar of literary and cultural studies and as a creative writer. She has lived, studied, and worked in Toronto, Montreal, Boston, and Seoul, and holds a PhD in English literary studies. Wills is the 2020–2023 Chancellor’s Research Chair at The University of Winnipeg in Manitoba. 


“I'm looking for writing that is innovative with language, structure, and style. Writing that draws together the political, the social, and the necessary with aesthetics and artistry. I’m looking for someone to be a partner in challenging the status quo and disrupting narratives. My ideal mentee will have time to read as well as write. I am looking to mentor someone who is Black, Indigenous, and/or a person of colour. Members of QTBIPOC communities are especially encouraged.”



For more information, please contact:

Amanda Hopkins - Director, Author Programs
ahopkins@writerstrust.com 

Writers' Trust of Canada